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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's up to 2004 shows it had no effect. >> in april 1968, i was in ebenezer baptist church in atlant
's self-defense that the society enables through regulations, through laws that have passed, through norms it tries to establish. and one of the big things that is missing from this debate, we can go back and forth and have a conversation about whether armed security would stop anything from happening, didn't help in columbine, but the bigger question is, we as a society, what does this say when you want to put more guns in your place of education, in your place where you send your 5, 6, 7-year-old children? is that the message, the sort of society that we want to be? or do we want to take self-defense before the moment of conflict? do we want to look at legislation? do we want to put policies in place that allow us to defend ourselves before we get to a point where we say, i wish that teacher had it. by the time we get to that point, it was too late. >> hailey, were your surprised by the press conference? >> i have been optimistic for the official statement all week, and i have to say i was very disappointed. i think that their statement was a pretty huge disservice to their membership an
with the law, secretary clinton ordered this review to determine exactly what happened in benghazi. that is how we can learn and improve. i want to convey our appreciation to ambassador pickering, admiral mullen and 13. -- their team. in the hours and days after the terrorist attacks, at the secretary's direction, which took immediate steps to protect people and our post. we launched a worldwide review of the overall security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous p
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
>> and i have the right to petition the courts if the don't agree with a law. we are not going to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by >> juliet: wake up, everybody, it's saturday, december 29th. i'm juliet huddy. down to the wire for a fiscal cliff deal. and is it mitch mcconnell to the rescue. live in washington on the 11th hour negotiations. >> and did you know about to fall off the dairy cliff? >> juliet: have you seen the prices? >> dave: as high as 8 bucks a gallon for milk. >> clayton: oak
corruption scandals. russian president vladimir putin signed a bill into law today banning americans from adopting russian children. the move terminated more than 50 adoptions that already were underway. the measure came in reaction to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russians accused of human rights abuses. former president george h.w. bush was said to be alert and improving today. a family spokesman said he's even singing with doctors and nurses. mr. bush is 88 years old. he's been hospitalized in houston with complications from bronchitis. this week, he was placed in intensive care, but in an e-mail yesterday, his chief of staff said the former president wants people to put the harps back in the closet. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: the victim of a horrific gang rape in india died tonight at a hospital in singapore. the attack enraged much of the country, and the reaction caught the government off-guard. ray suarez has more. >> suarez: the fury across india has been building for nearly two weeks, since a 23-year-old medical student was gang-
for granted, three great civil rights laws, medicare, just the vibrancy in those tapes, all you have to do is listen and he's back alive again swearing and being the most fascinating person that i've ever met in public life. and the books are helping because they create this giant character. he deserves it. >> and giant situations in front of him the way he came in as well as the way he left. >> a giant character and also -- >> dark clouds. >> you were there closely with him, but also so complicated. our relationships with our presidents are so personal, and the fact is he accomplished remarkable things politically. and yet you never get through a couple of pages of carol's books where you go, ew, this was not a good guy. >> i don't think -- that's not true. i disagree that he's not a good guy. he's a strange guy. >> they're all strange. >> there are not many presidents that take you into the bathroom and talk to you while they're in the bathroom. >> not enough. >> there's not many presidents that when he talks to you violates the normal human space between people so your head is right up
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
. ackman. >> they also hired shiller, the law firm. not clear why they would hire a law firm at this point. no reason given. they have hired them, which is another, hmm, wonder what they're up to kind of move. bob pisani is on the floor with what's moving today. >> we're up 24 points in the dow. and a lot of people think a grand bargain is impossible at this point. but president obama coming back from vacation in hawaii. that's an indication that some kind of deal -- however small -- is definitely coming. i want to point out, and i know you've been negative on this mastercard data on retail sales, and everybody thinks it's going to be a mess for the holiday season. i want to point out that the stocks are not acting that way. that this is a disaster for the season. the s&p retail index hit an historic high on december 3rd. historic high. since then, it has only been down about 3%. these stocks are not acting like there's a disaster. i can give you several reasons why they're not down so far. number one, we are going to see eps growth in the fourth quarter from some of them because of the ex
for an american law that targets russian human rights violators. over the past two decades american families have adopted some 60,000 russian kids. the united nations children's fund estimates there are 740,000 orphans in the country with only a few thousand russians trying to adopt them. we will see an immediate impact. a russian official says 46 children whom americans are right in the process is of adopting right now you would not be able to leave the country. >> usually typically depending on the region a 10 day waiting period and those 46 parent ares, couples are in the ten day wait so it is devastating that they already met their child and started the bonding process. i can't even fathom what they are going through. >> heart break. and teleenviesed comments the president said countries should take care of their own and added with some sarcasm there are probably many places in the world where living standards are so higher than ours. so what, are we going to send our children there? maybe we should move there ourselves. children's rights advocates say it will have a strong effect with orphan
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)